Standard Linux Directories

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  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/sparxsys_linux/www.linuxindya.com/includes/file.inc on line 647.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/sparxsys_linux/www.linuxindya.com/includes/file.inc on line 647.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/sparxsys_linux/www.linuxindya.com/includes/file.inc on line 647.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/sparxsys_linux/www.linuxindya.com/includes/file.inc on line 647.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/sparxsys_linux/www.linuxindya.com/includes/file.inc on line 647.
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  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/sparxsys_linux/www.linuxindya.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/sparxsys_linux/www.linuxindya.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/sparxsys_linux/www.linuxindya.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.

Undertanding Linux Standard Directories

This Blog explain Linux Standard Directories . All Linux systems provide a standard set of core directories. The following directories are used to hold programs that must run when you are booting your Linux system, configuration files for those programs, libraries used by those programs, temporary files created by running programs, and so on:
* /: As the top-level directory of a Linux system, this directory must exist so that other directories can be located within it.
* /bin: A directory that holds core applications used by a Linux system.
* /dev: A directory that holds special files, known as device nodes, which are used to access any devices that are attached to your Linux system.
* /etc: A directory that holds system configuration information, contains the files that explain the sequence of applications that execute on a Linux system as part of its boot process, and stores configuration files for some of the applications that are executed by a Linux system.

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